#DystoniaAroundTheWorld Challenge, Dystonia Around the World Challenge, Short story, work in progress, Writing journey

2021 Happy News: A Story Brought to Life

A post saying good riddance 2020 and welcome 2021 will be along shortly but I have happy news that can’t wait for to edit post and have in depth ponders of what to write. I am going to be published! People will be able to open a book and meet the characters I have created. Eek!

A short story, The Ghost Writer, has been accepted by Cardigan Press for an anthology. I began writing it during the Dystonia Around the World challenge last year and finished with the help of a short story course run by the lovely Myszka at the delightful Foxes Retreat. I’m so happy. I keep reading the acceptance email with a huge grin on my face and know this is how Jo March felt when she got published.

Later this year, I’ll have a physical book on my bookcase containing my story and my name; what better encouragement is there for getting me to continue pursuing this emotional rollercoaster career as a writer. And to think I very nearly did not submit it. The stars must have been aligned and my spell bottle must have been working its magic when I pressed send.

Magical Spell Bottle ready for action

If I am this excited to get a short story accepted, imagine what will happen when I get an agent or publishing deal on a book.

Happy writing!

Stay safe and stay at home if you can

Love

Writing journey

Writing, Disability and RNA DISCO Chapter

It is International Day of People With a Disability and #PitMad on Twitter. This could make a powerful combination at getting authors with disabilities and chronic health conditions seen and our stories told. There are 14.1 million adults* in the UK with a disability, yet they are rarely seen in fiction and romance. When they are they are often in what can be described as ‘inspiration porn.’ There is a drive to change this as well as make writing and publishing more inclusive to the disabled community and underrepresented groups. Hopefully this will provide an influx of novels showing relatable characters representing all.


Last month, the Romantic Novelist’s Association took an important step in inclusivity by the introduction of the RNA Disco Chapter. This is an online chapter for RNA members with disabilities, chronic health conditions and neurodiversity to offer support, a safe place to chat about the obstacles we face and friendship. I was excited and nervous to take part in the #UKRomChat last week on Twitter to discuss the chapter and its importance. The chat can be began here.

RNA DISCO logo

I have been lucky to receive a bursary for the New Writer’s Scheme, which has given me more opportunities and friendships that I could dream of. Without it I would not have a full manuscript of A Blend of Magic on my PC and out for submission, and I would not have found my tribe. Hopefully, this chapter will spread awareness of the scheme and offer others the chance.

Two founding members Jeanna Louise Skinner and Denise also discuss the chapter, underrepresented writers and how NWS has affected their lives here.

Take care and stay safe.

Happy writing!

Love

*From Scope UK

#DystoniaAroundTheWorld Challenge, Dystonia Around the World Challenge, Writing journey, Writing process

Success: Dystonia Around the World Update

This is a belated update on the Dystonia Around the World challenge. With a final push we did it! As a team we managed to walk around the world for dystonia by clocking up 25,994 miles and raising £ 14,257 for Dystonia UK. As a small charity every little counts and I am so pleased to have been involved.

Infographic showing 25994  miles logged and £14,257 raised for Dystonia UK
The sea crashing against cliff at Boscastle, Cornwall
My Destination: Boscastle

I did not manage to write 1000 miles as planned but limped in at 630. This would have got me to my ultimate destination, The Witchcraft Museum at Boscastle, via Bridlington, Haworth, and the atmospheric Mother Shipton’s cave but I would have had to hitchhike back.

A female hand hitchhiking on a deserted road

Things I have learned during this challenge

  • 2020 is consistent in derailing any plans it knows about including this one hence why my personal challenge was not completed in the time frame.
  • I am slow at writing and even slower at editing. Rather than an extensive range of flash fiction posted here, my phone and notebook is dotted with unedited and half finished short stories. They will be edited one day so you can read them despite the strong urge to hide them away.
  • Zoom is my friend and allows me to meet other people. The last couple of months it has allowed me to connect with other writers and those with dystonia including those at Dystonia UK’s first digital conference. I would always shy away from video calls but now I have embraced them.
  • I never remember how much the impact the colder seasons have on my dystonia ; I need to include and adjust goals accordingly.
  • Dopamine plays an important role in achieving goals, and what I could achieve last year is not the same as it is now I am on reduced medication. But then, as my headmistress always used to quote “Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you’ll land among the stars.”* 630 exceeded my initial expectations as did my final total raised.
  • I have more people believing in me and writing than I imagined.

Thank you everyone who supported me.

Happy writing and stay safe

Love

  • I am unsure who said that originally. Google has answers from Oscar Wilde, Norman Vincent Peale, author of The Power of Positive Thinking to many others. If you know let me know.
Dystonia Around the World Challenge, Just life, Writing journey

Remember, remember 2020’s November: #DystoniaAroundTheWorld news, writing and RNA DISCO launch

How can we be hurtling towards the second week of November? I had grand plans for individual catch up posts about my fundraising for Dystonia UK, stories and book reviews, but time sped by thanks to the anxious wait for news from America. I don’t think I have felt so wretched waiting for election results. At least here in the UK, we know the results of elections and referendums over our first cup of tea.

But much needed hope has entered 2020 and I’m excited to see what 2021 brings with President Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris. Maybe climate change and things that matter will be back on the agenda. The last few days, like the rest of 2020, has been a sharp reminder we are living in historical times and future students will study and analyse our lives in great detail. Their exams will be a nightmare as they struggle to keep up with the quick changing events.

The last four years has brought Brexit, our own government turmoil, and COVID so often I have felt like I have been living in act one of a dystopian novel waiting for the trauma of act 2 to start. Today I feel lighter and more hopeful that act 2 may be kinder than expected. We may even slip into a more uplifting genre.

Books leading to happy ever afters?

So over the next few days there will be a flurry of catch up blogs including news about the Dystonia Around the World challenge, the launch of the Romantic Novelist Association’s DISCO chapter, witchy book reviews and hopefully, an edited short story.

Remembrance Sunday

Today is Remembrance Sunday and a day of reflection. Usually in our village, a crowd gathers to watch the parade of scouts and guides walk to the war memorial for the laying of the wreaths. Today we will watch the reduced proceedings on Facebook live from our own homes or paying our respects our own way, saying thanks to our loved ones and others who fought for peace.

I have little memories of my Grandad who fought in Burma except his wonderful hugs but on days like today, I miss him so much it aches. It also intensifies the grief of others I have lost. I am sure it affects many the same. So I offer you all a big hug, a cyber cup of tea and hope that next year normal life with our loved ones can resume and on days like today, we can stand side by side.

Take care, stay safe and those who are typing away for NaNoWriMo, happy writing.

Love

All about Books, Guest post, Writing journey, Writing process

Guest Post: WORLD BUILDING with Guardian: Recruit author, Catherine Rull

Catherine Rull

Today I am excited to introduce Catherine Rull, the Australian author of paranormal romance, Guardian: Recruit as a guest on my blog. Her book is about guardian angels that watch over a psychiatric facility in London. She’s here for a quick chat to tell us more about world-building, and hitting those word counts.

Hi, Kate. Thanks for having me.

Hello. Shall we get started? Okay, so first up: how did you come up with the world for Guardian: Recruit?

Well, it actually came to me in a dream while I was pregnant in 2008. In my dream, I was driving and saw some small things flying around. When I got out of my car, I realised they were pixies. One of them was someone I knew as a child, but he’d died. And he told me, children’s souls got to grow up but as pixies. When I woke up, I wrote down the idea. But of course pixies aren’t really sexy so I went with angels.

Good choice. Was there anything else from your dream?

No. That was it. The rest, I had to figure out myself.

Well, the world in Guardian: Recruit’s quite fleshed out. Do you have any advice for other paranormal writers?

I think there are probably five things you’ll need to do to build your own world.

  1. Base it on something real. Any novel requires a certain level of world building, regardless of the genre. I think the more you can ground your world in reality, the more believable it is. The setting for Guardian: Recruit is similar to the hospital school where I worked in London. Of course, it wasn’t creepy there at all but that’s the beauty of creating your own world. You add your imagination to the mix and hopefully create something vivid and realistic for your readers.
  2. Research. Researching different aspects of your story (eg. your character’s job; angels from different cultures) often leads to more ideas for your books.
  3. The new character. Another important tool in world building is to have a character who is new to the world. This allows you to explain some of the rules of the world to the reader in a more organic way. You see this all the time, including in Harry Potter. As someone who didn’t know he was a wizard, Harry had to be taught the way the wizarding world works and the reader learns about it with him.
  4. Layering. If you have the time, I suggest editing the book with some breaks in between. This allows you to notice things you may not have realised before, or come up with new ideas to add to your world. This gives the book its many layers.
  5. Series Bible. It’s important to keep track of the rules you’ve set for your world. I keep a “Series Bible” for all my books (not just the paranormal ones) to ensure continuity.

Thanks, Catherine. That’s a handy list. Did it take you long to write Guardian: Recruit?

I wrote about five pages in 2008. Then, in 2014, I picked it up again and set myself 800-words minimum a day until it was finished. And it wasn’t always easy. Sometimes, I would fall asleep at my laptop trying to hit my word count for the day and I would wake up to find a row of “bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb” where my hand rested while I was sleeping. But then I’d wake myself up and keep going till I reached that word count. There were times when I felt like what I was writing was absolutely terrible, but when it was time to edit, those parts were never as bad as I thought. Sometimes, they were actually quite good! Either way, it’s better to edit bad writing than to have a blank page.

I completed the first draft of Guardian: Recruit in about 8 weeks, and then I edited it lots of times. I’m a “pantser”—that means I like to write “by the seat of my pants”. I find that this gives me space to surprise myself. I personally find plotting very restrictive. “Pantsing” allows the characters the freedom to get themselves into trouble, instead of me plotting their challenges 😊

Anyway, after writing the first draft, I print out my manuscripts to edit on paper, input the changes to the digital copy, edit on the laptop and print again. I usually edit books between five to ten times in this way. But I editing is all part of making a tight story and a clean manuscript. In 2015, Guardian: Recruit was shortlisted in the UK’s Mslexia Women’s Novel Competition.

That’s great. Congratulations!

Thanks.

So, do you already have other books lined up after Guardian: Recruit?

Yes. I’ve already written Book 2 of the Guardian Series and have the basic premise for the third book. I think the sequel will come out some time in 2021. I am currently working on other projects as well—some sequels to the chick lit and rom com that have already come out this year: The Fat Chicks’ Club Series and my Swim Bike Run Series.

You sound very busy. Do you have a set routine or favourite drink while you’re writing?

Not so much a routine. Like most writers, I have a day job. Plus, I have young children so I fit my writing around my other responsibilities. However, before the lockdowns, I sometimes used to go to my local library to get away from the distractions at home. That was usually when I needed to write or edit something in time for a competition or a submission to an agent or editor.

As for a favourite drink. I’m a big kid, so I like cold drinks like bubble tea and frozen Cokes. I like to keep it fun. Writing brings me so much joy, and I hope my readers feel that in my stories. You know, even though Guardian: Recruit has a seemingly sombre premise, you’ll find there’s a lot of humour in it as well. I don’t think I’d like to write anything too sad or depressing—I like my characters to have a sense of humour. It’s important to be able to laugh at life.

That’s good advice. Well, all the best with all those projects!

Guardian: Recruit is the first book in the Guardian Series. It’s available in ebook and paperback from Amazon, Book Depository and Barnes & Noble.

Social media contacts

website: www.catherinerull.com

Facebook: Catherine Rull (novelist): https://www.facebook.com/CatherineRullnovelist

Twitter: @catherinerull13

Instagram: @catherine.rull 

Thanks again Catherine, and I can’t wait to read your book. We are heading into November and NaNoWriMo so let me know if you are joining in and have any other word building tips.

Happy writing and stay safe!

Love